5 Cleaner Wrasse Myths

The introduction of Labroides spp. cleaner wrasses to marine aquarium systems is generally ill-advised. Though some hobbyists report success in keeping these obligate cleaners long term, the vast majority of specimens entering the market are doomed to perish prematurely from starvation. Nonetheless, despite their abysmal captive survival rate, people continue to buy these wrasses, likely … [Read More]

Why Isn’t Cryptocaryon irritans a Major Problem for Wild Marine Fish?

During yesterday’s Thanksgiving get-together, which my wife and I host for my side of the family every year, a teenaged nephew asked me about marine ich (Cryptocaryon irritans)—the one fish disease he’s heard something about from a friend who keeps saltwater tanks. As I explained the parasite and its lifecycle and why I think it’s … [Read More]

You Asked Us…So We’ve Answered!

Since we released The Salt Smart Guide to Preventing, Diagnosing, and Treating Diseases of Marine Fishes eBook earlier this year, the support from readers has been unequivocally positive. But, what’s the one thing that’s been requested many times since then? A print version – so folks could add it into their aquarium library! It’s totally … [Read More]

The Powder Blue Tang: An Iconic Beauty Demanding Exceptional Care

The powder blue tang (Acanthurus leucosternon) is a breathtakingly beautiful, widely recognized (even among non-hobbyists) marine fish that can be a real pain to maintain in aquaria. While it is possible to keep one successfully under ideal conditions, most specimens that enter the aquarium trade unfortunately perish within a short period after purchase. Why such … [Read More]

How to Beat Those Pacific Blue Tang Blues

Its common names include the Pacific blue tang, regal tang, hippo tang, palette surgeonfish, yellow-tail blue tang, and probably several others that presently elude me. Kids know it as the addle-brained Dory from Finding Nemo. Whatever common name you apply to it, though, Paracanthurus hepatus is one gorgeous blue fish! Morphologically speaking, P. hepatus is … [Read More]