Toledo Zoo Aquarium Renovation – Update 13: Making Steady Progress

Since we last brought you an update on the $25.5 million Aquarium renovation currently underway at the Toledo Zoo, this ambitious project has continued to move forward with more livestock arriving and more state-of-the-art exhibits nearing completion. To get a sense of what awaits visitors when the new Aquarium opens its doors in 2015, check out the following pictorial graciously provided by Jay Hemdal, the Toledo Zoo’s Curator of Fishes and Invertebrates:

The Zebra Shark arrived in early September. It's tail makes up about half its length!

The Zebra Shark arrived in early September. Its tail makes up about half its length!

Service area 3 next to the Sea Nettle Exhibit looking north.

Service area 3 next to the Sea Nettle Exhibit looking north.

Panorama of the South Gallery – invertebrate touch tank is in middle, jewel tanks at the far right and the entrance ramp at far left.

Panorama of the South Gallery – invertebrate touch tank is in middle, jewel tanks at the far right and the entrance ramp at far left.

Installation of artificial corals in the large Pacific Reef began in September.

Installation of artificial corals in the large Pacific Reef began in September.

Layout of the coral in the Pacific Reef. Not all areas will have coral this dense.

Layout of the coral in the Pacific Reef. Not all areas will have coral this dense.

Check out the Toledo Zoo Aquarium renovation page for all updates.

Photo credit: Jay Hemdal/Toledo Zoo

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About Jeff Kurtz

Jeff Kurtz is the Co-founder/Editor of Saltwater Smarts, former Senior Consulting Editor for Tropical Fish Hobbyist Magazine, and the aquarist formerly known as “The Salt Creep.” He has been an aquarium hobbyist for over 30 years and is an avid scuba diver.

Comments

  1. Best Wishes to the team!. Eagerly waiting to see the end result!

  2. I know schedule 40 is fairly strong and since the Zoo appears to be utilizing sch 40, are regular people like myself underestimating the strength of schedule 40? Is schedule 80 overkill even for a commercial aquarium?

    • Chris Aldrich says:

      I’ve always used schedule 40 and would say it’s more than enough for nearly any home aquarist. Schedule 40 can handle 450 psi, while schedule 80 can handle 630 psi. Since our aquarium plumbing systems aren’t sealed I can’t really see a need for schedule 80 unless you’re utilizing a pump that can throw out water at serious velocities, which isn’t likely for any residential setup (or, in this case, a commercial setup). One thing to keep in mind is schedule 80 isn’t always gray, though I wouldn’t expect it to be produced in white as that’s how 40 is usually sold.

      I’ll touch base with Jay at the Zoo and see what they’re using/planning to use.

    • Chris Aldrich says:

      Hi P, I spoke with Jay and here is what he had to say on the topic:

      In terms of the schedule 40 versus 80, it is a mixture throughout the building, depending on the application. In the case of the sea nettles, it is low pressure, so schedule 40 is fine, but notice the use of schedule 80 true-union valves, that is where the “weak point” is…not the straight pipe. Where people get into trouble is when they use schedule 40 sanitary fittings!

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